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Tag: Veljko Dubljevic

aerial view of highway

Jul 14, 2020

What Ethical Models for Autonomous Vehicles Don’t Address – And How They Could Be Better

What happens if people use autonomous vehicles to do something bad? Philosophy and science, technology and society professor Veljko Dubljevic explains the ethical concerns. 

photo looking up inside Talley Student Union's technology tower

Oct 28, 2019

NC State Researchers Land NSF Grant to Develop AI Tools for Workforce Empowerment

The $980,000 grant will allow NC State researchers to develop new artificial intelligence (AI) tools to help job seekers and employers manage a rapidly changing labor market. 

An image of the brain

May 8, 2019

The Ethics and Challenges Surrounding Neuroenhancement

New work from philosophy professor Veljko Dubljevic explores the ethics of neuroenhancement and calls for legal and regulatory oversight of the emerging technologies. 

An assortment of pills sit on a white table

Aug 20, 2018

Proposal Seeks to Improve Assessment of Drug Risks

In a new paper, philosophy professor Veljko Dubljevic proposes a suite of changes to overhaul the Multi-Criteria Drug Harm Scale, which informs drug policies across Europe. 

Mar 14, 2018

Neuroscience Studies Claiming Free Will is an Illusion Are Flawed

A new analysis points out flaws in studies claiming that free will is an illusion. NC State assistant professor of philosophy Veljko Dubljevic has co-authored a paper that says neuroscience hasn’t definitively proven anything one way or the other. 

May 31, 2017

Study: ‘Moral Enhancement’ Technologies Are Neither Feasible Nor Wise

A recent study by researchers at NC State and the Montreal Clinical Research Institute (IRCM) finds that “moral enhancement technologies” — which are discussed as ways of improving human behavior — are neither feasible nor wise, based on an assessment of existing research into these technologies. 

May 30, 2017

‘Moral Enhancement’ Is Science Fiction, not Science Fact

When it comes to improving morality, traditional interventions seem to have much better chances than drugs and brain stimulation devices: the dangers of the latter are considerable, and are likely to cause more harm than good because they endanger the balance of moral intuitions. Guest column by Veljko Dubljević, assistant professor of philosophy at NC State University. 

May 16, 2017

Experts say using ‘morality drugs’ is a ‘terrible idea’

In a new study, researchers from North Carolina State University and the Montreal Clinical Research Institute (IRCM) assessed several different types of moral enhancement, including four pharmaceutical approaches and three neurostimulation techniques. Veljko Dubljevic, philosophy, featured.